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Tutorials

How Should I Encode Audio for My DVD?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

There are 3 kinds of audio that can be used when authoring DVDs. Dolby Digital (AC-3) – compressed audio with a very high quality, taking up very little space on the DVD. This allows you to encode the video at a higher data rate for better quality since you have more space available for video content. Dolby is the preferred choice for DVD audio. PCM – uncompressed audio, no different than a “.wav” file in your editing software. Two hours of PCM audio can take up over 1GB, which is a good portion of your DVD, leaving less room...

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Live Capture using Matrox MXO2 Mini

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Today’s handheld HD camcorders offer amazing quality for their cost and size, but there is a price to be paid for the portability – the video is captured using compression. Without compression, the video files would be so large that the camera’s recording capacity would be used up in a matter of minutes! There are several types of compression that can be applied to reduce the overall size of the video file. The first thing to go is color resolution. When all the color information is kept in a digital video file, it is referred to as...

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Realtime AVCHD editing with Panasonic and Edius NEO2

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Grass Valley has announced that their EDIUS NEO2 software is being updated with the “Booster” package to provide realtime native editing of AVCHD, eliminating the need to transcode footage prior to editing. No other NLE software provides realtime AVCHD editing, so this is exciting news for users. The EDIUS NEO2 software has been bundled with the Panasonic AG-HCM150 and AG-HCM70 camcorders for some time now, and is also being included with the new AG-HCM40 units. Users that purchased their Panasonic camera on or after October 9,...

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MPEG-2 or H.264 for Blu-ray disc?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

When encoding video for Blu-ray disc, you can use MPEG-2 or H.264 encoding. MPEG-2 is used for DVD, but a much higher data rate is used for HD content on Blu-ray, so the image can be quite good. The benefit of H.264 is that at the lower data rates used to fit long programs on a disc, H.264 is more efficient than MPEG-2 and will produce a better quality. At higher data rates though, this advantage is less apparent. Considering that H.264 takes about 5x as long to encode as MPEG-2, you must decide whether the content is worth the extra hours of...

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To Upgrade or Not to Upgrade – A Brief Guide for RTX2 Users

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

I often get questions from customers seeking advice about upgrading their RTX2 systems. If you are one of the many RTX2 users out there with an older system and Adobe CS3, there is one important consideration before upgrading your software. If you are running the RTX2 with Adobe CS3 on an older machine and you would like to upgrade to CS4, please make sure that your motherboard or system is on the approved list from Matrox. You can find the list by following this link – ...

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Sonic BD PowerStation

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

The Sonic BD PowerStation is the ultimate professional encoding solution for authoring Blu-ray or DVD discs, based on the same core technology as Scenarist, the encoder of choice for Hollywood movie releases on DVD and Blu-ray. This suite is used to encode video, create DVD or Blu-ray menus, and run simulations on the result. Completed projects may be burned direct to DVD and Blu-ray, or compliant master files may be output for replication. BD PowerStation uses a USB dongle for security, but is very easy to install quickly using the online...

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How Much Video Can I Fit on a DVD?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Video files must be compressed to the MPEG-2 format to meet the DVD specification. The amount of compression can vary, and is determined by the length of the program, as the compressed content must fit the available space on the DVD. At the highest quality setting, a standard 4.7GB DVD can hold 1 hour of video, but at a medium quality setting, the same DVD can hold 2 hours of video. If quality is not that important for your application, you can even fit 3 hours or more on a single DVD by compressing the material at a lower data rate. You will...

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Patching a Video Background Using Photoshop

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Adobe, Tutorials | 0 comments

You just shot a really exciting seminar and can’t wait to get back to the studio to review the footage. The guest speaker looks great – the lighting, framing and focus are right on! Then to your dismay, you see it – the unwelcome item in the background. It could be a glaring red “Exit” sign, a restroom sign, or anything else that you find distracting or annoying, including a wayward bystander. Well, there is hope. The technique discussed here works for video shots that are “locked down,” meaning the camera is on a...

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Saving Compromised MiniDV Footage

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Sooner or later, it happens to everyone – you shoot that once-in-a-lifetime footage with your miniDV camcorder, only to find later that the playback is garbled. There are many reasons for bad recordings, including clogged heads and misaligned tape transports, so of course keep a miniDV head cleaning tape in your camera bag and run it at the first sign of trouble.My Sony cameras display a head clog warning on the view screen, and just playing the head cleaner for 10 seconds has always resolved head clogs in the field before they became a real...

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Interlaced vs. Progressive Video

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

For decades, NTSC has been the standard for US television and video, using the 29.97 frame per second interlaced video format. All standard definition TVs, video cameras and VCRs conformed to that spec, but now with HD video we hear a lot about progressive formats such as 720p and 1080p. What does this mean? Let’s use a round number of 30 to describe the number of individual “frames” that make up each second of 29.97 interlaced video. Each frame is made up of two “fields”, with one field consisting of all the odd...

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