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Tutorials

Patching a Video Background Using Photoshop

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Adobe, Tutorials | 0 comments

You just shot a really exciting seminar and can’t wait to get back to the studio to review the footage. The guest speaker looks great – the lighting, framing and focus are right on! Then to your dismay, you see it – the unwelcome item in the background. It could be a glaring red “Exit” sign, a restroom sign, or anything else that you find distracting or annoying, including a wayward bystander. Well, there is hope. The technique discussed here works for video shots that are “locked down,” meaning the camera is on a...

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Saving Compromised MiniDV Footage

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Sooner or later, it happens to everyone – you shoot that once-in-a-lifetime footage with your miniDV camcorder, only to find later that the playback is garbled. There are many reasons for bad recordings, including clogged heads and misaligned tape transports, so of course keep a miniDV head cleaning tape in your camera bag and run it at the first sign of trouble.My Sony cameras display a head clog warning on the view screen, and just playing the head cleaner for 10 seconds has always resolved head clogs in the field before they became a real...

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Interlaced vs. Progressive Video

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

For decades, NTSC has been the standard for US television and video, using the 29.97 frame per second interlaced video format. All standard definition TVs, video cameras and VCRs conformed to that spec, but now with HD video we hear a lot about progressive formats such as 720p and 1080p. What does this mean? Let’s use a round number of 30 to describe the number of individual “frames” that make up each second of 29.97 interlaced video. Each frame is made up of two “fields”, with one field consisting of all the odd...

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64-bit OS benefits Adobe editors

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Adobe, Tutorials | 0 comments

For years, computers have used 32-bit operating systems, meaning that the largest number the system memory could address would be 2^32, or 4GB. In reality, users could expect just over 3GB actually available for use by applications other than the OS. Data pathways inside the computer would also be limited to 32-bit. For standard-definition video editing, 3GB might have got the job done for most Premiere users, but many editors are now commonly dealing with HD video resolutions of 1920×1080 and beyond, with 2K and 4K cinema resolutions...

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White Balancing Your Camcorder

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Different light sources have different “color temperatures”, and any object lit with these sources will take on the cast of that source. The human vision system compensates for different light sources, so white always looks white, but camcorders sometimes need our help in determining the best white balance setting for a given situation. In other words, we have to tell the camera what white looks like, and it can then use that as a point of reference to accurately reproduce any color in the scene. All camcorders will have...

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RT.X2 LCD Display Calibration for CS4 Users

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Matrox now offers a monitor calibration utility for RT.X2 users that allows the use of an inexpensive LCD display for accurate color grading. This does not apply to the RT.X2 LE or SD models, which lack the DVI output necessary to drive the LCD. The calibration utility is part of the new 4.0 drivers for use with Adobe CS4, and is accessed via the Matrox “TV” icon at the lower right of the Windows screen. Step-by-step illustrated calibration instructions are included in the Matrox User Guide .pdf file found on the Matrox driver disc...

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Staying Native or Going Intermediate? Transcoding and Premiere Pro CS5

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Adobe (Licenses), Tutorials | 0 comments

In this brief video, Worldwide Product Evangelist Jason Levine will explain the basis of transcoding, showcasing the workflow outside of CS5; he”ll then show you what a native workflow is all about in Premiere Pro CS5, and explain some scenarios for staying native or moving to an intermediate codec. This video also points out some of the misconceptions about transcoding, but also highlights some of the round-tripping capabilities of CS5 with FCP and AMC. [youtube]xx_ipWmrhE0[/youtube]

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miniDV or HDV tape for an HDV camcorder?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

HDV camcorders record to inexpensive miniDV tape. You can get special HDV-graded tapes, but they can cost several times more than miniDV tapes. Since the recording uses digital data, the image quality will be identical regardless of the media quality.Think of a still image or word processing file copied to different types of media – hard drive, CD, floppy, USB thumb drive – the data is the same regardless of the media used. It’s the same with digital tape – the only benefit of using HDV tape is that you lessen the chance of getting...

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Apple ProRes 422 codec vs. Uncompressed HD

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Apple, Tutorials | 0 comments

UPDATE — October, 2011: ProRes is no longer just an editing codec – it’s also used in portable field recording devices to bypass in-camera compression, capturing directly to ProRes with 10-bit 4:2:2 quality, ready to edit! Learn more about this exciting new hardware here or see our review of the Atomos Ninja for a detailed look at just one of the solutions that we provide. _______________________________________________ Apple introduced the ProRes 422 video codec for Final Cut Studio 2 users in 2007. The codec is said to offer...

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IRE Setup with Matrox RT.X2

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

IRE is a measure of brightness for NTSC video, with black being 0 and white being 100, with shades of gray in between. In the US, the black level is normally set to 7.5 for broadcast. This means that the brightness scale runs from 7.5 to 100 rather than 0 to 100. Since Japan uses 0 IRE black setup levels, virtually all miniDV cameras will use 0 IRE for black setup when making a recording. In Premiere Pro with RT.X2, you will find the “Setup” option in Project Settings > Playback Settings > Video Output, which by default is at...

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