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Tutorials

Why Does Matrox RT.X2 Use a 720×486 Video Frame Size?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

NTSC DV and DVD video both use a frame size of 720×480, but the D1 NTSC Broadcast Video spec is 720×486. The Matrox Axio hardware uses the D1 spec, so to maintain project cross-compatibility between the RT.X2 and Axio platforms for editors using both, the RT.X2 uses the D1 spec. If you capture using a Matrox DV preset, the video IS captured at the standard 720×480 size, so in the Premiere preview window, the DV image is centered with 3 black lines above and 3 below to fill out the 486 frame size. When exporting to DVD, the 6...

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Creating a PIP (Picture in Picture) with Premiere Pro

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Creating a PIP effect, or even multiple PIPs for a collage effect, is easy to accomplish in Premiere Pro. The background image or video should be on the V1 track, and any images or clips that you want to overlay as PIPs should be on higher tracks, V2 or above. Select a clip on the timeline by left-clicking it to highlight it, then use the Adobe Motion effect, found in the Effect Controls bin, to change the Scale, Position and Rotation of the overlay clip. Any time you make the image smaller or reposition it to fill less than the full screen,...

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Can I Edit Matrox Projects on Non-Matrox Systems?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

The short answer is no, but there are workflows you can use. While there are issues opening a Matrox project on a non-Matrox machine, you can easily go from a Premiere-only project to a Matrox project for realtime effects and finishing work. If you capture DV footage with the RT.X2 and want to edit that footage on a PC that does not have Matrox hardware (Premiere only), you can install the Matrox codecs from the RT.X2 driver disc and you can then work with those Matrox DV .avi clips using a Premiere DV preset. This does not work for...

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Should I Convert My SD Videos to HD?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

I hear this question quite often, and the answer is, “It depends.” You might have a large collection of videos that you have shot over the years in standard definition that will be viewed on a new HD display. Would those videos benefit from an upconversion to HD, perhaps on Blu-ray disc? Probably not. Most new DVD players have special HD upconvert hardware built in that will make standard DVDs look as good as they can on your HD display, so the best bet for archiving and viewing with the least trouble and expense is by simply...

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Sony DV Tapeless Workflow for RT.X2

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Tapeless workflows are rapidly becoming very popular because they eliminate the lengthy process of capturing footage from video tape to the editing system hard drive. Video clips recorded to flash media in the camera can be quickly transferred to the editor’s hard drive at faster-than-realtime speeds so he/she can get right to work. In fact, the editor may be able to edit directly from the flash media when a compatible card reader is attached to the edit system, though transfer to a hard drive is recommended. The popular Sony HVR-Z7U...

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What is AVCHD?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 1 comment

AVCHD means Advanced Video Codec High Definition, and is the new “standard” for consumer HD camcorders. AVCHD uses H.264 video compression, a type of MPEG-4, replacing the older MPEG-2 format used for DVD and HDV. H.264 is a more efficient codec than MPEG-2, meaning that at comparable data rates, H.264 will look better. The catch is that H.264 requires a lot more computer processing power for playback and editing. The current versions of computer editing packages such as Adobe Premiere Pro CS4, Apple Final Cut 6 and Grass Valley...

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The Great Debate – NTSC HD vs. PAL HD

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 1 comment

Technically, the title of this article is incorrect, since NTSC and PAL refer to standard-definition video formats. Nevertheless, you may see these terms come up in the various places, so please read on and it will soon make sense. As HD video was first gaining momentum a few years back, many videographers were excited that we might finally be able to have a worldwide video standard that would eliminate the incompatibility issues between the NTSC and PAL video formats used in different countries. In case you’re not familiar with the...

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Do I Need Uncompressed Editing?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

If you are doing work for broadcast delivery, you may want to consider capturing and editing in an uncompressed format. Digital video cameras all use some sort of compression on the video file before saving, or the data files would be enormous. Even though the source video may have been compressed, in an uncompressed workflow, further image degradation is kept to a minimum and graphics and compositing will remain cleaner. AJA and Black Magic Design offer capture and playback cards for uncompressed workflows. For Mac users, the ProRes 422 codec...

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Making Money with Dance Recitals

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

I’ve been videotaping dance recitals for 15 years now, and it’s proven to be a lucrative segment of the event video market for me as owner of Digital Vision Productions. Parents spend a lot of time and money sending their kids to dance lessons, and it all comes together once a year at the big recital held at the end of the season, usually in May or June as school lets out for summer break. Parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles all come to the theater to view the performances, and it’s a big deal. Younger performers might only be in one...

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Updates to DVD Export Settings for MXO2 CS5.5 Users

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Matrox, Tutorials | 0 comments

If you’re using Premiere Pro CS5 or CS5.5 on the PC with Matrox MXO2 hardware, there’s some important information we’d like you to be aware of to get the best DVD export quality. This info only pertains to exporting “MPEG-2 for DVD” from a Matrox NTSC sequence – if you’re using a Matrox HD or Matrox PAL sequence, the cropping does not apply and you may disregard these instructions. With the CS4 drivers for MXO2, a Matrox NTSC project was 720×480, but starting with CS5, Matrox changed this to 720×486. Since DVD...

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