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Tutorials

Apple ProRes 422 codec vs. Uncompressed HD

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Apple, Tutorials | 0 comments

UPDATE — October, 2011: ProRes is no longer just an editing codec – it’s also used in portable field recording devices to bypass in-camera compression, capturing directly to ProRes with 10-bit 4:2:2 quality, ready to edit! Learn more about this exciting new hardware here or see our review of the Atomos Ninja for a detailed look at just one of the solutions that we provide. _______________________________________________ Apple introduced the ProRes 422 video codec for Final Cut Studio 2 users in 2007. The codec is said to offer...

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IRE Setup with Matrox RT.X2

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

IRE is a measure of brightness for NTSC video, with black being 0 and white being 100, with shades of gray in between. In the US, the black level is normally set to 7.5 for broadcast. This means that the brightness scale runs from 7.5 to 100 rather than 0 to 100. Since Japan uses 0 IRE black setup levels, virtually all miniDV cameras will use 0 IRE for black setup when making a recording. In Premiere Pro with RT.X2, you will find the “Setup” option in Project Settings > Playback Settings > Video Output, which by default is at...

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Consistent White Balance for Live Events

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Adobe, Tutorials | 0 comments

When videotaping live events such as wedding ceremonies, school plays, concerts or dance recitals, the videographer typically has no control whatsoever over the lighting. To make matters worse, the lighting may be constantly changing during the event. A church may have stained glass windows, meaning any entering sunlight may be tinted by the color of the glass. In this case, manually white-balancing the camera may produce good colors, but what happens when the outside light coming in alternates between sunny and cloudy? It can have adverse...

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Matrox MXO or MXO2?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Matrox, Tutorials | 0 comments

Which video adapter is right for your Mac? The MXO is an output-only device, while the MXO2 offers both input and output and is portable. When working in Final Cut 2, the MXO connects to the secondary DVI output of your Mac and converts the video preview to an actual video signal for monitoring or recording to a deck. HD video can be monitored via an appropriate LCD monitor via DVI connection, and an included utility allows you to calibrate the LCD for accurate color grading. The full 1920×1080 HD resolution is supported with 1:1 pixel...

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Why Does Matrox RT.X2 Use a 720×486 Video Frame Size?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

NTSC DV and DVD video both use a frame size of 720×480, but the D1 NTSC Broadcast Video spec is 720×486. The Matrox Axio hardware uses the D1 spec, so to maintain project cross-compatibility between the RT.X2 and Axio platforms for editors using both, the RT.X2 uses the D1 spec. If you capture using a Matrox DV preset, the video IS captured at the standard 720×480 size, so in the Premiere preview window, the DV image is centered with 3 black lines above and 3 below to fill out the 486 frame size. When exporting to DVD, the 6...

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Creating a PIP (Picture in Picture) with Premiere Pro

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Creating a PIP effect, or even multiple PIPs for a collage effect, is easy to accomplish in Premiere Pro. The background image or video should be on the V1 track, and any images or clips that you want to overlay as PIPs should be on higher tracks, V2 or above. Select a clip on the timeline by left-clicking it to highlight it, then use the Adobe Motion effect, found in the Effect Controls bin, to change the Scale, Position and Rotation of the overlay clip. Any time you make the image smaller or reposition it to fill less than the full screen,...

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Can I Edit Matrox Projects on Non-Matrox Systems?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

The short answer is no, but there are workflows you can use. While there are issues opening a Matrox project on a non-Matrox machine, you can easily go from a Premiere-only project to a Matrox project for realtime effects and finishing work. If you capture DV footage with the RT.X2 and want to edit that footage on a PC that does not have Matrox hardware (Premiere only), you can install the Matrox codecs from the RT.X2 driver disc and you can then work with those Matrox DV .avi clips using a Premiere DV preset. This does not work for...

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Should I Convert My SD Videos to HD?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

I hear this question quite often, and the answer is, “It depends.” You might have a large collection of videos that you have shot over the years in standard definition that will be viewed on a new HD display. Would those videos benefit from an upconversion to HD, perhaps on Blu-ray disc? Probably not. Most new DVD players have special HD upconvert hardware built in that will make standard DVDs look as good as they can on your HD display, so the best bet for archiving and viewing with the least trouble and expense is by simply...

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Sony DV Tapeless Workflow for RT.X2

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Tapeless workflows are rapidly becoming very popular because they eliminate the lengthy process of capturing footage from video tape to the editing system hard drive. Video clips recorded to flash media in the camera can be quickly transferred to the editor’s hard drive at faster-than-realtime speeds so he/she can get right to work. In fact, the editor may be able to edit directly from the flash media when a compatible card reader is attached to the edit system, though transfer to a hard drive is recommended. The popular Sony HVR-Z7U...

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What is AVCHD?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 1 comment

AVCHD means Advanced Video Codec High Definition, and is the new “standard” for consumer HD camcorders. AVCHD uses H.264 video compression, a type of MPEG-4, replacing the older MPEG-2 format used for DVD and HDV. H.264 is a more efficient codec than MPEG-2, meaning that at comparable data rates, H.264 will look better. The catch is that H.264 requires a lot more computer processing power for playback and editing. The current versions of computer editing packages such as Adobe Premiere Pro CS4, Apple Final Cut 6 and Grass Valley...

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