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Tutorials

Premiere Pro Import Using Media Browser

Posted by on Jan 19, 2015 in Adobe, News, Tutorials | 0 comments

Any video editor who’s been working with Adobe Premiere Pro over many years and versions has likely used DV capture via Firewire, or has captured from tape using a third-party capture card. The preferred import method for that captured footage was, and still is, to use “File > Import” in Premiere Pro to bring in the .avi or .mov clips, ready to edit. Even if you’ve been more recently introduced to Premiere Pro editing, File > Import may at first seem the most obvious, if not only, method to import your media. However, times have...

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Fixing out-of-focus HD video footage

Posted by on Jul 22, 2014 in News, Tutorials | 5 comments

You’ve shot some important, irreplaceable footage, only to later discover that it’s slightly out of focus. What can you do? This happened to me recently on a dance recital shoot which is my biggest event of the year, recording six 2.5-hour shows over two days. I rented a newer HD camera for the event to get better low-light performance – and a better image overall – than my older HDV camera could provide. I’d rented that same camera the year before, so I knew how to use it and loved the results I’d gotten last time. Being...

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Mezzanine Codec Options for PC Video Editors

Posted by on Jun 29, 2014 in News, Tutorials | 1 comment

In years past, it was often necessary to convert, or transcode, original HD camera video clips into another codec, known as an intermediate or mezzanine, prior to beginning any editing. These new clips had far less compression applied, and were therefore easier to decode for playback. Mezzanine codec file sizes fall in between those of the camera source clips and uncompressed video, hence the name. Most newer PCs having decent specs, such as those with Intel Core i7 processors, should have no problem editing AVCHD and similar sources natively,...

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Top 5 Reasons to Upgrade Your Workstation

Posted by on Feb 6, 2014 in Computers, Safe Harbor, Tutorials | 0 comments

Whether you need a completely new system, or just a few minor tune-ups, here are the top 5 reasons to upgrade your workstation. 1)      Slow Boot Drive. Many older computers are still booting up with SATA or even IDE hard drives. A workstation equipped with an SSD will likely boot in seconds and not minutes. SATA hard drives require time to speed up and will continue to be slower than a solid state drive during regular operation. SSD drives will not only boot faster but also launch applications faster. The extra time saved with the...

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Adobe Encore CS6 Preview Quality Fix

Posted by on Mar 7, 2013 in Adobe, Tutorials | 0 comments

  When making a DVD in Adobe Encore CS6 on your PC, you may find that the video playback looks very low res and jagged in the Monitor window, but will snap back to a sharp image whenever playback is paused. There is a quick solution in the Edit > Preferences panel. Simply change the Playback Quality to High, and Display Mode to Accelerated GPU Effects, as shown in the comparison images. You will see in the top example that any diagonal lines are quite “steppy”. It’s even more noticeable during playback than the still...

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Saving Compromised MiniDV Footage

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Sooner or later, it happens to everyone – you shoot that once-in-a-lifetime footage with your miniDV camcorder, only to find later that the playback is garbled. There are many reasons for bad recordings, including clogged heads and misaligned tape transports, so of course keep a miniDV head cleaning tape in your camera bag and run it at the first sign of trouble.My Sony cameras display a head clog warning on the view screen, and just playing the head cleaner for 10 seconds has always resolved head clogs in the field before they became a real...

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Interlaced vs. Progressive Video

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

For decades, NTSC has been the standard for US television and video, using the 29.97 frame per second interlaced video format. All standard definition TVs, video cameras and VCRs conformed to that spec, but now with HD video we hear a lot about progressive formats such as 720p and 1080p. What does this mean? Let’s use a round number of 30 to describe the number of individual “frames” that make up each second of 29.97 interlaced video. Each frame is made up of two “fields”, with one field consisting of all the odd...

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64-bit OS benefits Adobe editors

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Adobe, Tutorials | 0 comments

For years, computers have used 32-bit operating systems, meaning that the largest number the system memory could address would be 2^32, or 4GB. In reality, users could expect just over 3GB actually available for use by applications other than the OS. Data pathways inside the computer would also be limited to 32-bit. For standard-definition video editing, 3GB might have got the job done for most Premiere users, but many editors are now commonly dealing with HD video resolutions of 1920×1080 and beyond, with 2K and 4K cinema resolutions...

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White Balancing Your Camcorder

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Different light sources have different “color temperatures”, and any object lit with these sources will take on the cast of that source. The human vision system compensates for different light sources, so white always looks white, but camcorders sometimes need our help in determining the best white balance setting for a given situation. In other words, we have to tell the camera what white looks like, and it can then use that as a point of reference to accurately reproduce any color in the scene. All camcorders will have...

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RT.X2 LCD Display Calibration for CS4 Users

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Matrox now offers a monitor calibration utility for RT.X2 users that allows the use of an inexpensive LCD display for accurate color grading. This does not apply to the RT.X2 LE or SD models, which lack the DVI output necessary to drive the LCD. The calibration utility is part of the new 4.0 drivers for use with Adobe CS4, and is accessed via the Matrox “TV” icon at the lower right of the Windows screen. Step-by-step illustrated calibration instructions are included in the Matrox User Guide .pdf file found on the Matrox driver disc...

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