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Tutorials

Fixing out-of-focus HD video footage

Posted by on Jul 22, 2014 in News, Tutorials | 0 comments

You’ve shot some important, irreplaceable footage, only to later discover that it’s slightly out of focus. What can you do? This happened to me recently on a dance recital shoot which is my biggest event of the year, recording six 2.5-hour shows over two days. I rented a newer HD camera for the event to get better low-light performance – and a better image overall – than my older HDV camera could provide. I’d rented that same camera the year before, so I knew how to use it and loved the results I’d gotten last time. Being...

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Mezzanine Codec Options for PC Video Editors

Posted by on Jun 29, 2014 in News, Tutorials | 0 comments

In years past, it was often necessary to convert, or transcode, original HD camera video clips into another codec, known as an intermediate or mezzanine, prior to beginning any editing. These new clips had far less compression applied, and were therefore easier to decode for playback. Mezzanine codec file sizes fall in between those of the camera source clips and uncompressed video, hence the name. Most newer PCs having decent specs, such as those with Intel Core i7 processors, should have no problem editing AVCHD and similar sources natively,...

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Top 5 Reasons to Upgrade Your Workstation

Posted by on Feb 6, 2014 in Computers, Safe Harbor, Tutorials | 0 comments

Whether you need a completely new system, or just a few minor tune-ups, here are the top 5 reasons to upgrade your workstation. 1)      Slow Boot Drive. Many older computers are still booting up with SATA or even IDE hard drives. A workstation equipped with an SSD will likely boot in seconds and not minutes. SATA hard drives require time to speed up and will continue to be slower than a solid state drive during regular operation. SSD drives will not only boot faster but also launch applications faster. The extra time saved with the...

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Adobe Encore CS6 Preview Quality Fix

Posted by on Mar 7, 2013 in Adobe, Tutorials | 0 comments

  When making a DVD in Adobe Encore CS6 on your PC, you may find that the video playback looks very low res and jagged in the Monitor window, but will snap back to a sharp image whenever playback is paused. There is a quick solution in the Edit > Preferences panel. Simply change the Playback Quality to High, and Display Mode to Accelerated GPU Effects, as shown in the comparison images. You will see in the top example that any diagonal lines are quite “steppy”. It’s even more noticeable during playback than the still...

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Sonic BD PowerStation

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

The Sonic BD PowerStation is the ultimate professional encoding solution for authoring Blu-ray or DVD discs, based on the same core technology as Scenarist, the encoder of choice for Hollywood movie releases on DVD and Blu-ray. This suite is used to encode video, create DVD or Blu-ray menus, and run simulations on the result. Completed projects may be burned direct to DVD and Blu-ray, or compliant master files may be output for replication. BD PowerStation uses a USB dongle for security, but is very easy to install quickly using the online...

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How Much Video Can I Fit on a DVD?

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Video files must be compressed to the MPEG-2 format to meet the DVD specification. The amount of compression can vary, and is determined by the length of the program, as the compressed content must fit the available space on the DVD. At the highest quality setting, a standard 4.7GB DVD can hold 1 hour of video, but at a medium quality setting, the same DVD can hold 2 hours of video. If quality is not that important for your application, you can even fit 3 hours or more on a single DVD by compressing the material at a lower data rate. You will...

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To Upgrade or Not to Upgrade – A Brief Guide for RTX2 Users

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

I often get questions from customers seeking advice about upgrading their RTX2 systems. If you are one of the many RTX2 users out there with an older system and Adobe CS3, there is one important consideration before upgrading your software. If you are running the RTX2 with Adobe CS3 on an older machine and you would like to upgrade to CS4, please make sure that your motherboard or system is on the approved list from Matrox. You can find the list by following this link - ...

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Saving Compromised MiniDV Footage

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

Sooner or later, it happens to everyone – you shoot that once-in-a-lifetime footage with your miniDV camcorder, only to find later that the playback is garbled. There are many reasons for bad recordings, including clogged heads and misaligned tape transports, so of course keep a miniDV head cleaning tape in your camera bag and run it at the first sign of trouble.My Sony cameras display a head clog warning on the view screen, and just playing the head cleaner for 10 seconds has always resolved head clogs in the field before they became a real...

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Interlaced vs. Progressive Video

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Tutorials | 0 comments

For decades, NTSC has been the standard for US television and video, using the 29.97 frame per second interlaced video format. All standard definition TVs, video cameras and VCRs conformed to that spec, but now with HD video we hear a lot about progressive formats such as 720p and 1080p. What does this mean? Let’s use a round number of 30 to describe the number of individual “frames” that make up each second of 29.97 interlaced video. Each frame is made up of two “fields”, with one field consisting of all the odd...

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Patching a Video Background Using Photoshop

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Adobe, Tutorials | 0 comments

You just shot a really exciting seminar and can’t wait to get back to the studio to review the footage. The guest speaker looks great – the lighting, framing and focus are right on! Then to your dismay, you see it – the unwelcome item in the background. It could be a glaring red “Exit” sign, a restroom sign, or anything else that you find distracting or annoying, including a wayward bystander. Well, there is hope. The technique discussed here works for video shots that are “locked down,” meaning the camera is on a...

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